Category: Classical Hollywood

Flynn Meets Fidel

Flynn biographer Thomas McNulty (Errol Flynn: The Life and Career) discusses the improbable meeting between Flynn and Fidel Castro in late 1958. Flynn was in Cuba to cover the revolution for the Hearst newspapers and joined Castro just as the rebels were preparing their final push toward Havana. In this excerpt from his interview, McNulty recounts a particularly memorable moment between the two men, when Flynn must have felt he was looking at a real-life version of his younger swashbuckling self. The encounter between Flynn and Castro has inspired at least one novel (Boyd Anderson’s Errol, Fidel, and the Cuban Rebel Girls) and served as a backdrop for the narrative film The Last of Robin Hood (starring Kevin Kline as Flynn). We don’t need fictional license. The real story is unbelievable enough.  

Continue Reading

Cuban Tinseltown

A Cuban rebel fighter and confidante of Fidel Castro in the 1950s, today Max Lesnik is a radio commentator and the director of Alianza Martiana, an organization dedicated to the principle of Latin American sovereignty. Lesnik is also a lover of Classical Hollywood and a master storyteller. In this clip, he describes the regular presence of Hollywood movie stars in Havana in the 1940s and 1950. Lesnik, it turns out, had a personal brush with one of them: Errol Flynn. As Lesnik recalls, Flynn was in Havana with a camera crew (shooting footage for what would eventually become the semi-documentary Cuba Story) during the first weeks of 1959, around the time the rebels rode in. “There’s a shot of some rebels standing in front of a building, and I’m in that group,” Lesnik told us, adding, “I always wanted to thank Flynn for introducing me to the American public.” But we’re saving that part of the interview for the finished film.

Continue Reading
Screen City

Screen City

In the 1940s and ’50s, Havana was a movie-mad city, reportedly boasting more movie theatres than even New York. These included countless neighborhood houses, as well as some of the most elaborate movie palaces anywhere, ranging in architectural style from the classical (the Payret; 1,800 seats) to Art Deco (the Fausto; 1,669 seats), to modernist (the Karl Marx, formerly the Blanquita: 7,000 seats). Overwhelmingly, they showed Hollywood films.

Errol Flynn’s Ghost will offer a rare glimpse of Havana’s historic movie theatres, and the fascination with American culture they once embodied.

Among our stops will be the Cine Yara (above). Originally part of the Radio Centro complex, the Yara opened in 1947 as one the earliest examples of midcentury modernist architecture on the island. The theatre was operated by Warner Bros. and known for showing films in the Cinerama widescreen format. It is still considered one of Havana’s principal movie venues.

Continue Reading
Actors and Aliens

Actors and Aliens

In 2013, to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the release of The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), the National Archives at Riverside — which maintains thousands of federal records from Southern California, Arizona, and Clark County, Nevada — published the naturalization records of the film’s two leads, Errol Flynn (Robin) and Olivia de Havilland (Maid Marian).

We reproduce them here as a reminder that Golden Age Hollywood, so adept at exporting American culture around the globe, was an immigrant community, from the Eastern European moguls who founded the studios, to the German emigre directors of the 1930s and 1940s, to numerous other continental types who found work in front of and behind the camera.

Note, by the way, Flynn’s stated profession of “actor-author.” He wrote three books: Beam Ends (1937; an autobiographical account of his sailing exploits), Showdown (1946; an adventure novel), and My Wicked, Wicked Ways (1959; considered by many to be the classic Hollywood autobiography). And, of course, there were his journalistic stints, including his coverage of the revolution in Cuba.

Continue Reading
Print the Legend

Print the Legend

El Instituto Cubano de Arte e Industria Cinematográficos (ICAIC), the Cuban film institute, was formed soon after the revolution in 1959. As part of its mission, ICAIC presents numerous screenings of Cuban and international films every year. For each film, a unique poster by a Cuban graphic artist is commissioned. The three featured here — for Charlie Chaplin’s The Kid (1921), Alfred Hitchcock’s Rope (1948), and Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining (1980) — demonstrate not only the visual inventiveness of the artists, but the enduring popularity of Hollywood films on the island.

These posters were part of the 2011 exhibit “Cuban Film Posters: From Havana to the World” at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Beverly Hills, California.

Continue Reading

A Foreign Affair

Noted author and Hollywood historian Scott Eyman explains just how important foreign distribution was to the Classical Hollywood studio system in the mid-20th century, comprising as much as 40 percent of its revenue. This interview was shot in Eyman’s West Palm Beach writing den, which contains one of the greatest collections of Hollywood literature and memorabilia we’ve ever stumbled across. (Luckily, we were able to keep our balance, and the cameras rolling.) Scott Eyman is the author of numerous best-selling books, including John Wayne: The Life and Legend, Lion of Hollywood: The Life and Legend of Louis B. Mayer, and Empire of Dreams: The Epic Life of Cecil B. DeMille.

Continue Reading